Education in America: Textbooks

by CJFosdick on September 8, 2009

There is revolution going on in Education in America. Only a few people are aware of this revolution — that is the frightening state of what is happening in our textbooks. For a little background, there are 140,000 schools in America, yet only three major textbook companies which produce most of the textbooks used in these schools. Textbooks are a ten billion dollar a year business, showing that these three companies are getting rich with the monopoly they have in textbook writing and production. Further, only a handful of undisclosed people, not elected, not held to account, and working in secret, determine what is included in the content of these textbooks. They are called the “The Language Police” and they control the wording of textbooks from kindergarten through college. Bet you didn’t know this. Me either!

These few unnamed people brainwash our children so that they grow up thinking what these few people want them to think. The Language Police do this by several means:

•Outright lies, including lying by omission.
•Hidden Agendas, such as gender or gay right emphasis.
•Political Correctness — Words and pictures you cannot use in textbooks.
•Inclusion or lack of inclusion and/or emphasis in content of the book.
•Propaganda, used to get a certain political message across, most likely Liberal.
•Exploitation of Multiculturalism

There is an absurdity in all of this that might be humorous if it were not so serious to the future of our country. For example, in American History, textbooks today are quite critical of America, often showing only our negative history. Textbooks for years have shown the Native Americans as peace-loving, gentle, exploited people, not as those who often killed, stole, enslaved, and were at war with each other. There is an emphasis showing Whites as always the aggressors and America as a nation always starting wars and oppressing others. ACCORDING TO THE LANGUAGE POLICE, YOU CAN ONLY CRITICIZE THE OPPRESSOR, AND IF YOUR SKIN IS WHITE, YOU ARE AN OPPRESSOR. Think of Hiroshima, the Coming of Columbus, Slavery, and the Encampment of Japanese during World War II. These are all portrayed in modern texts as examples of how rotten America is.

Perhaps this explains why so many Americas seem to hate America today; they are taught to think so in schools from kindergarten through college.
They are brainwashed to think throughout their entire educational program that America is terrible. You teach a person from the age of 6 to 22 (or more) you will often have these students for life, thinking as you want them to think.

YES, THE QUALITY OF EDUCATION IN AMERICA IS TRENDING EVER DOWNWARD AND EVERYONE NEEDS TO KNOW THE SORRY STATE OF WHAT IS GOING INTO OUR TEXTBOOKS.

Information taken from the Fox News Special on Education and Textbooks, “Do you know what textbooks your children are reading?” 9/04/09

{ 1 comment… read it below or add one }

C.L. Palmer January 25, 2013 at 8:07 am

As an educator, I do notice certain signs of bias. However, bias is an unavoidable human quality and impossible to avoid in its entirety. There are occasions when uncomfortable facts are presented, perhaps slipping through the cracks in the editing process. Social studies textbooks often describe the brutality of the Mayans and Aztecs, for example, admitting that all was not sunshine and flowers until the white man arrived. They also describe the African side of the slave trade, in which Portugal was looking for gold and the Congo offered slaves as a substitute. In addition, textbooks often mention that tribes captured and sold each other, and were warehoused by North African Arabs.

A good teacher will use textbooks as one, not exclusive, source of content. Still, they are typically written by college professors, who are typically liberals. Still, students need to hear that perspective as well so they will not be shocked in the college classroom. I try to present all of the facts and lead a well-reasoned, evidence-based discussion. My job is to teach them how to think, not what to think.

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